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Jiles Halling's Blog

Jiles spent 10 years living and working in Champagne working for Moet et Chandon.

During that time, Jiles built up a vast amout of knowledge about all things bubbly, making lots of contacts in the region, and getting to know the people who've lived there for centuries while crafting their products with love and passion.

After moving back to the UK in late 2004, Jiles decided to bring this unique knowledge and contribution to the wider world.  The hidden secrets, the best champagnes and the insider knowledge that is not usually available through the normal channels, is now here for you.  Since March 2010, Jiles is once again based in Champagne, living in the small grand cru village of Verzy.

In this you'll find everything you ever wanted to know about champagne, the drink, the people, the region and the food.  Please enjoy your visit and please join in the conversation by leaving your thoughts in the comments section or liking us on Facebook.


 

So what's the last remaining thing you need to know before you buy a bottle champagne?

 In parts 1 and 2 of this series we looked at two things that affect the style and quality of a champagne. They were

    the proportion in which the different grape varieties are blended together and
    the quality of those grapes

The third factor that has a crucial influence on the champagne is the length of time it’s aged.

Here’s part 2 of my 4 part series about how to tell what a champagne is like before you buy the bottle

 Lots of people are unsure about how to choose one bottle of champagne over another and simply buy a name they know.

Back, by popular demand, is a series of 4 short articles on how to choose champagne, especially a champagne that you've never tried before.

These 4 tips will

  • give you the confidence to venture outside the famous brands,
  • help you discover some of the amazing champagnes made by the less-well-known makers and
  • provide lots of fun when you share your new-found knowledge with your friends. 

I'm not entirely sure that what happens in the champagne market in France necessarily reflects what is happening, or is going to happen, elsewhere, but it's intriguing to watch the way sales are developing here in France and fortunately the statisticians at the good old CIVC can be relied upon to generate mountains of data to look at.

We're now officially into La Veraison : the final ripening period before the harvest. Now's the time when the black grapes start turning black - up until now all the grape varieties, Chardonnay, Pinot Noir and Pinot Meunier have been the same green colour

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